Quotes Categories

Georg C. Lichtenberg Quotes

(1742-1799), German Physicist, Satirist

What is the good of drawing conclusions from experience? I don't deny we sometimes draw the right conclusions, but don't we just as often draw the wrong ones?

Category: Experience

We can see nothing whatever of the soul unless it is visible in the expression of the countenance; one might call the faces at a large assembly of people a history of the human soul written in a kind of Chinese ideograms.

Category: Faces

Once we know our weaknesses they cease to do us any harm.

Category: Fallibility

The pleasures of the imagination are as it were only drawings and models which are played with by poor people who cannot afford the real thing.

Category: Fantasy

Even truth needs to be clad in new garments if it is to appeal to a new age.

Category: Fashion

He who says he hates every kind of flattery, and says it in earnest, certainly does not yet know every kind of flattery.

Category: Flattery

Food probably has a very great influence on the condition of men. Wine exercises a more visible influence, food does it more slowly but perhaps just as surely. Who knows if a well-prepared soup was not responsible for the pneumatic pump or a poor one for a war?

Category: Food And Eating

If there were only turnips and potatoes in the world, someone would complain that plants grow the wrong way.

Category: Food And Eating

A clever child brought up with a foolish one can itself become foolish. Man is so perfectible and corruptible he can become a fool through good sense.

Category: Fools And Foolishness

Man is a masterpiece of creation if for no other reason than that, all the weight of evidence for determinism notwithstanding, he believes he has free will.

Category: Free Will

What most clearly characterizes true freedom and its true employment is its misemployment.

Category: Freedom

Everyone is a genius at least once a year; a real genius has his original ideas closer together.

Category: Genius

What I do not like about our definitions of genius is that there is in them nothing of the day of judgment, nothing of resounding through eternity and nothing of the footsteps of the Almighty.

Category: Genius

There are people who possess not so much genius as a certain talent for perceiving the desires of the century, or even of the decade, before it has done so itself.

Category: Greatness

One might call habit a moral friction: something that prevents the mind from gliding over things but connects it with them and makes it hard for it to free itself from them.

Category: Habit