Quotes Categories

Joseph Addison Quotes

(1672-1719), British Essayist, Poet, Statesman

A man's first care should be to avoid the reproaches of his own heart, and his next to escape the censures of the world.

Category: Censure

It is folly for an eminent man to think of escaping censure, and a weakness to be affected with it. All the illustrious persons of ;antiquity, and indeed of every age in the world, have passed through this fiery persecution.

Category: Censure

Cheerfulness is the best promoter of health and is as friendly to the mind as to the body.

Category: Cheerfulness

Mere bashfulness without merit is awkwardness.

Category: Confidence

A good conscience is to the soul what health is to the body; it preserves constant ease and serenity within us; and more than countervails all the calamities and afflictions which can befall us from without.

Category: Conscience

There is not any present moment that is unconnected with some future one. The life of every man is a continued chain of incidents, each link of which hangs upon the former. The transition from cause to effect, from event to event, is often carried on by secret steps, which our foresight cannot divine, and our sagacity is unable to trace. Evil may at some future period bring forth good; and good may bring forth evil, both equally unexpected.

Category: Consequences

A contented mind is the greatest blessing a man can enjoy in this world.

Category: Contentment

Courage that grows from constitution often forsakes a man when he has occasion for it; courage which arises from a sense of duty acts ;in a uniform manner.

Category: Courage

Their is no defense against criticism except obscurity.

Category: Critics And Criticism

See in what peace a Christian can die.

Category: Death And Dying

The fear of death often proves mortal, and sets people on methods to save their Lives, which infallibly destroy them.

Category: Death And Dying

I will indulge my sorrows, and give way to all the pangs and fury of despair.

Category: Despair

There is not so variable a thing in nature as a lady's head-dress.

Category: Dress

Authors have established it as a kind of rule, that a man ought to be dull sometimes; as the most severe reader makes allowances for many rests and nodding-places in a voluminous writer.

Category: Dullness

Rides in the whirlwind and directs the storm.

Category: Editing And Editors