Quotes Categories

Cities And City Life Quotes

I look upon those pitiful concretions of lime and clay which spring up, in mildewed forwardness, out of the kneaded fields about our capital... not merely with the careless disgust of an offended eye, not merely with sorrow for a desecrated landscape, but with a painful foreboding that the roots of our national greatness must be deeply cankered when they are thus loosely struck in their native ground. The crowded tenements of a struggling and restless population differ only from the tents of the Arab or the Gipsy by their less healthy openness to the air of heaven, and less happy choice of their spot of earth; by their sacrifice of liberty without the gain of rest, and of stability without the luxury of change.

Author: John Ruskin (1819-1900)

Profession: British Critic, Social Theorist

Boston is a moral and intellectual nursery always busy applying first principals to trifles.

Author: George Santayana (1863-1952)

Profession: American Philosopher, Poet

There is no quiet place in the white man's cities. No place to hear the unfurling of leaves in spring, or the rustle of an insect's wings. But perhaps it is because I am a savage and do not understand. The clatter only seems to insult the ears.

Author: Chief Seattle (1786-1866)

Profession: American Indian Chief of the Suquamish

New York is not Mecca. It just smells like it.

Author: Neil Simon (1927)

Profession: American Playwright

In place of a world, there is a city, a point, in which the whole life of broad regions is collecting while the rest dries up. In place of a type-true people, born of and grown on the soil, there is a new sort of nomad, cohering unstably in fluid masses, the parasitical city dweller, traditionless, utterly matter-of-fact, religionless, clever, unfruitful, deeply contemptuous of the countryman and especially that highest form of countryman, the country gentleman.

Author: Oswald Spengler (1880-1936)

Profession: German Philosopher

All things atrocious and shameless flock from all parts to Rome.

Author: Publius Cornelius Tacitus (55-117 AD)

Profession: Roman Historian

City life is millions of people being lonesome together.

Author: Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)

Profession: American Essayist, Poet, Naturalist

A great city is that which has the greatest men and women.

Author: Walt Whitman (1819-1892)

Profession: American Poet

The great city is that which has the greatest man or woman: if it be a few ragged huts, it is still the greatest city in the whole world.

Author: Walt Whitman (1819-1892)

Profession: American Poet

Through this broad street, restless ever, ebbs and flows a human tide, wave on wave a living river; wealth and fashion side by side; Toiler, idler, slave and master, in the same quick current glide.

Author: John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892)

Profession: American Poet, Reformer, Author

The cities of America are inexpressibly tedious. The Bostonians take their learning too sadly; culture with them is an accomplishment rather than an atmosphere; their ''Hub,'' as they call it, is the paradise of prigs. Chicago is a sort of monster-shop, full of bustles and bores. Political life at Washington is like political life in a suburban vestry. Baltimore is amusing for a week, but Philadelphia is dreadfully provincial; and though one can dine in New York one could not dwell there.

Author: Oscar Wilde (1856-1900)

Profession: British Author, Wit

One belongs to New York instantly. One belongs to it as much in five minutes as in five years.

Author: Thomas Wolfe (1931)

Profession: American Author, Journalist

This city now doth, like a garment, wear the beauty of the morning; silent bare, ships, towers, domes, theatres and temples lie open unto the fields and to the sky; All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.

Author: William Wordsworth (1770-1850)

Profession: British Poet

To look at the cross-section of any plan of a big city is to look at something like the section of a fibrous tumor.

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright (1869-1959)

Profession: American Architect

The screech and mechanical uproar of the big city turns the citified head, fills citified ears -- as the song of birds, wind in the trees, animal cries, or as the voices and songs of his loved ones once filled his heart. He is sidewalk-happy.

Author: Frank Lloyd Wright (1869-1959)

Profession: American Architect